Past Krafts with Kathy 2020

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Winecork Tissue Box Cover- August 2020

Materials Needed:

  • lots of dry wine corks (you will need more than you think)
  • hot glue gun and extra glue sticks
  • tissue box  (Boutique size box used for this project
  • drop cloth or table protection

Directions:

  1. Using the tissue box to be covered as a pattern “dry fit” the corks around the base of the box.  This will help you determine the pattern you need to follow in making the sides.  You can choose to place the corks all horizontally, vertically or a mix of both.
  2. Make sure you have enough corks to cover the sides and most of the top of the box.
  3. Make sure enough room is left so that the tissue box can easily slide in and out of the finished cork cover. 
  4. Placing the glue on the smaller circle end, hot glue the bottom layer of corks together.  You may need to glue in a different place when you reach the corners.
  5. Working in a circular motion, continue gluing corks onto the wall of the box being created.  Keep the walls straight.
  6. Make sure the last row of corks is slightly higher than the tissue box.
  7. Dry fit where you want to place the corks to create the top of the tissue box cover.  Remember to leave an opening for the tissues to stick up through.
  8. Hot glue the corks to the top.  After the glue has had time to harden, remove any “strings” or “threads” of glue.
  9. Place your tissue box inside the cork box and display.

NOTES

WARNING-I should have practiced my wine cork tissue box cover at home first before trying to create my first ever while on camera. I might have decided-

  1.  It’s best to build each wall laying the corks on the table top insuring the wall comes out flat and then gluing the sides together.
  2. Maybe putting a piece of card stock on top of the tissue box in order to have something to glue the corks to when creating the top. 
  3. I made the full size corks fit my project rather than cutting additional corks to the needed size or even turning some in a vertical direction rather than all in a horizontal pattern.

I would not rate this project a Pinterest fail but it certainly does not get an A+ either.  Rest assured I will be more careful in selecting next month’s project.

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Bottle Bird Feeder- July 2020

Materials:

  • Empty plastic beverage bottle with cap (20 oz, 2 liter, etc)
  • Yarn/twine
  • Sharpie marker
  • Scissors
  • Bird seed
  • Duct tape
  • Hook to place on tree branch

Instructions:

  1. Clean and dry the plastic bottle. Set the cap aside.
  2. With a sharpie draw lines on the bottle resembling a door or large window.
  3. Take into account the shape of the bottle when drawing the lines. You need to keep the bottom line several inches from the bottom of the bottle as this is the reservoir for the bird seed.
  4. Carefully poke a starter hole in the bottle
  5. Using scissors following the drawn lines, cut the piece of plastic out on all 4 sides.
  6. Cut pieces of duct tape and place over the cut edges of the plastic bottle. Smooth in place.
  7. If the duct tape does not fit smoothly simply cut a few lines from the bottom edge up towards but not touching the fold over part of the duct tape and smooth down to the bottle.
  8. You can either cover the bottom edge or all 4 sides-your choice.
  9. Put cap on bottle
  10. Cut 2 pieces of yarn 12-18 inches long
  11. Tie 1 string around the top of the bottle just under the neck of the bottle leaving the ends long.
  12. Tie the other string onto the bottle but this time tie the knot directly opposite of the first knot.
  13. Keeping the strings of equal length, tie 1 knot at the end of all the strings. The bottle needs to hang straight so the birdseed does not spill out.
  14. Fill with several inches of bird seed and hang on a tree limb outside.

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Irish Pot of Gold – March 2020

Materials:

  • Terracotta flower pot
  • Green acrylic paint
  • St Patty’s Day fabric
  • Mod Podge & foam brush
  • Scissors  (pinking shears works well)
  • Candy

Directions:

  1. Paint flower pot green. Let dry and apply 2nd coat
  2. Cut pieces of fabric with pinking shears and Mod Podge to flower pot
  3. Apply second coat of Mod Podge to flower pot.
  4. Fill with candy

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Cork Recipe Card or Cell Phone holder

January 2020

Recipe Card Holder

Materials Needed:

  • Discarded dry wine corks: 16 about the same size
  • Hot glue gun and several hot glue sticks
  • Recipe card/index card

Directions:

  1. Arrange the corks lengthwise in rows of 2
  2. Glue the circular ends together and set aside to harden
  3. Glue along the length of the double cork and attach to a set of corks similar in length.
  4. Do this 4 times to form the base of the cork holder.
  5. Take 2 similar cork units and glue to the base forming the second layer.
  6. Take the remaining 2 cork units and hot glue them on top of the second layer, staggered
  7. Let completely harden and remove any glue strings.
  8. Place recipe card on holder.

                                                            Cell Phone Holder

Materials Needed:

  • Same as above except use 17 corks.
  • Utility knife
  • Large binder clip to hold cork in place when cutting in half.
  • Craft pot

            See below for suggested methods on cutting the corks.

Directions:

  1.  Make as directed above for the cell phone holder.
  2. Add lip if desired by cutting 1 cork in half lengthwise and gluing both split halves along the bottom layer of corks.
  3. Rotate cell phone to horizontal and use.
  4. Since cleanly cutting dry corks is next to impossible, you’ll need to soften them first by steaming them for 10 minutes. When they’re cool enough to touch, cut them with a serrated knife and glue to project.

                                                          OR

Boil your corks if you don’t have a steamer or if they’re store-bought. Fill a large pot about halfway with water, add the corks, and bring the water to a rolling boil. After 10 minutes, drain the water and let the corks cool.

  • Steaming works well for corks pulled from wine bottles, but it’s harder to soften unused corks purchased at craft stores or in bulk online.
  • If you boil the corks, they’ll absorb more water and swell more than if you’d steamed them. They’ll shrink back down to size as they dry, so don’t worry.
  • If your project involves glue, you’ll need to give boiled corks a little longer to dry than steamed corks.

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